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PISCES E-conference


Summary and continuing discussions [Tuesday focus: How do we overcome the cultural barriers identified by Participatory Market Mapping?]

Dear PISCES E-conference delegates and presenters,

Thank you all for your extremely interesting and insightful contributions to the e-conference last week.

The e-conference is continuing to run for this further week, as there has been high demand and interest from many participants last week. A summary from last week’s discussions around solar energy diffusion and participatory market mapping can be found below.

Following the e-conference for those who are interested we would welcome you to join our Marketing SIG http://www.hedon.info/MarketingSIG which we will be launching next week, where further discussions and points raised will be being moved to following this conference. Please let me know if you do not wish to be transferred to this list.


Some of the key points highlighted about Participatory market mapping (PMM):

- An advantage of using PMM has been to engage policy makers and enable them to understand the barriers and constraints policies have on biomass market chains (Santosh Kumar Patnaik).
- In Kenya looking at the charcoal markets helped implementation of tree management techniques, the improvement of small scale charcoal production methods, sustainably using existing trees and growing appropriate indigenous trees (Tameezan Gathui)
- The use of PMM to not only evaluate existing markets but also to gain a better understanding of how new technologies can meet household energy demands by providing a sustainable energy delivery system (Ewan Bloomfield)
- Gillian Davies gave an interesting example of how a ‘market driven approach’ can be used to develop the supply side of renewable energy technologies( RET). Engaging with entrepreneurs trying to access or already in existing markets can help to empower business owners to drive the market.



Some of the key points highlighted around empowering the poor through non-charity solar business solutions:
- Yotam Ariel highlighted that access to loans has helped to make solar energy affordable to users.
- Actual marketing strategies involve radio and stands in busy market areas, but research has shown that word of mouth is one of the most powerful marketing tools.
- Solar energy for remote rural locations, where installation of centralised gird electricity is still far from a reality, provides a feasible solution to achieve rural electrification in many developing countries. By government’s designing low interest loans and assisting with bulk purchasing of products rural electrification targets can be achieved as well as issues such as deforestation and land degradation being addressed by reducing biomass energy demand.
- Issues still remain in the diffusion of solar including lack of standardisation of products and little government quality control.
- Import taxes affect capital cost of solar products, PMM offers potential to assist in the diffusion of solar products and engage government officials to persuade them to eradicate or minimise import taxes on solar products as was highlighted to be the case in Tanzania, shared by Edward Matos in the EWB-UK E-conference earlier this month.
- Further barriers highlighted are that many villagers are unable to access loans due to high cost of having banking services in remote areas. An increasingly widespread solution to this is mobile banking systems.

Some key questions on PMM still unanswered:
- How do we overcome cultural barriers to technology implementation and integration?
- How can PMM be used to identify barriers to uptake through the analysis of market driven approaches? (Drew Corbyn)
- How can we build gender specific targets into PMM methodology? (Elizabeth Cecelski)
- What can be done to ensure quality and trading standards are in place? Has PMM been effective in addressing these issues? What strategies have been put in place to ensure monitoring and evaluation and quality control of marketed products following PMM workshops? Have governments taken an active lead in this?

We will focus discussions over the next four days on each of the questions above, where today the focus will be on exploring further cultural barriers to technology implementation. What experiences have practitioners had addressing cultural barriers to technology integration? How easy have they been to overcome? What difference has this made to the definition of appropriate technology?

However if you have any further questions you would also like answered following on from last weeks presentations or can contribute anything to the questions above please do email or post comments and responses.
Dear Miriam,

I want to thank you for organizing the e-conference,
it has been an eye opening event,
and I look forward to more ideas exchange in the future.

Warm regards,
Yotam

solar energy consultant
www.bennu-solar.com/resources


On Tue, Mar 29, 2011 at 5:55 PM, <hedon@hedon.info> wrote:

>
> Dear PISCES E-conference delegates and presenters,
>
> Thank you all for your extremely interesting and insightful contributions
> to the e-conference last week.
>
> The e-conference is continuing to run for this further week, as there has
> been high demand and interest from many participants last week. A summary
> from last weeks discussions around solar energy diffusion and participatory
> market mapping can be found below.
>
> Following the e-conference for those who are interested we would welcome
> you to join our Marketing SIG http://www.hedon.info/MarketingSIG which
> we will be launching next week, where further discussions and points raised
> will be being moved to following this conference. Please let me know if you
> do not wish to be transferred to this list.
>
>
> Some of the key points highlighted about Participatory market mapping
> (PMM):
>
> - An advantage of using PMM has been to engage policy makers and
> enable them to understand the barriers and constraints policies have on
> biomass market chains (Santosh Kumar Patnaik).
> - In Kenya looking at the charcoal markets helped implementation of
> tree management techniques, the improvement of small scale charcoal
> production methods, sustainably using existing trees and growing appropriate
> indigenous trees (Tameezan Gathui)
> - The use of PMM to not only evaluate existing markets but also to
> gain a better understanding of how new technologies can meet household
> energy demands by providing a sustainable energy delivery system (Ewan
> Bloomfield)
> - Gillian Davies gave an interesting example of how a market driven
> approach can be used to develop the supply side of renewable energy
> technologies( RET). Engaging with entrepreneurs trying to access or already
> in existing markets can help to empower business owners to drive the market.
>
>
>
> Some of the key points highlighted around empowering the poor through
> non-charity solar business solutions:
> - Yotam Ariel highlighted that access to loans has helped to make
> solar energy affordable to users.
> - Actual marketing strategies involve radio and stands in busy market
> areas, but research has shown that word of mouth is one of the most powerful
> marketing tools.
> - Solar energy for remote rural locations, where installation of
> centralised gird electricity is still far from a reality, provides a
> feasible solution to achieve rural electrification in many developing
> countries. By governments designing low interest loans and assisting with
> bulk purchasing of products rural electrification targets can be achieved as
> well as issues such as deforestation and land degradation being addressed by
> reducing biomass energy demand.
> - Issues still remain in the diffusion of solar including lack of
> standardisation of products and little government quality control.
> - Import taxes affect capital cost of solar products, PMM offers
> potential to assist in the diffusion of solar products and engage government
> officials to persuade them to eradicate or minimise import taxes on solar
> products as was highlighted to be the case in Tanzania, shared by Edward
> Matos in the EWB-UK E-conference earlier this month.
> - Further barriers highlighted are that many villagers are unable to
> access loans due to high cost of having banking services in remote areas. An
> increasingly widespread solution to this is mobile banking systems.
>
> Some key questions on PMM still unanswered:
> - How do we overcome cultural barriers to technology implementation
> and integration?
> - How can PMM be used to identify barriers to uptake through the
> analysis of market driven approaches? (Drew Corbyn)
> - How can we build gender specific targets into PMM methodology?
> (Elizabeth Cecelski)
> - What can be done to ensure quality and trading standards are in
> place? Has PMM been effective in addressing these issues? What strategies
> have been put in place to ensure monitoring and evaluation and quality
> control of marketed products following PMM workshops? Have governments taken
> an active lead in this?
>
> We will focus discussions over the next four days on each of the questions
> above, where today the focus will be on exploring further cultural barriers
> to technology implementation. What experiences have practitioners had
> addressing cultural barriers to technology integration? How easy have they
> been to overcome? What difference has this made to the definition of
> appropriate technology?
>
> However if you have any further questions you would also like answered
> following on from last weeks presentations or can contribute anything to the
> questions above please do email or post comments and responses.
>
> --
> HEDON PISCES E-conference - PISCES Market Mapping E-confernce
> Unsubscribe www.hedon.info/Groups | Visit the forum online
> http://www.hedon.info/forum17
>
>
 
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