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PISCES E-conference


UNBLOCKING THE BIOMASS MARKET SYSTEM IN SRI LANKA

Dear all

I am emailing on behalf of Namiz Musafer from Practical Action Sri Lanka who would like to introduce us this section of the report on Bioenergy Market Development and take us through a case study on participatory market mapping for bioenergy markets for industry, service and household sectors in Sri Lanka. He apologises for not being able to present this himself today but will be available for questions as soon as he can gain internet access in the next day or so. His presentation is as follows:

Outline:
Cooking accounts for 81% of total biomass consumption where biomass has a 47% of Sri Lanka’s national primary energy consumption. The aim of PISCES country program is to ensure energy access for the poor with the focus being on effective and sustainable utilisation of biomass energy for domestic and industrial energy demands. Following a capacity building exercise in 2008 to understand the (Participatory Market Systems Development) PMSD process, this paper presents the results of a Participatory Market Mapping (PMM) workshop to analyse bioenergy market systems of the domestic, institutional and industrial sectors in order to identify key issues in the market chain and where policy interventions are required. The workshop identified similarities between the enabling environments and supporting services for both markets. The workshops culminated with recommendations to improve policies and form product specifications in order to mature the market chains and improve the flow paths of bioenergy products.

Outcome :
The market mapping workshop was successful in identifying chain actors, enabling environment players, service providers and their inter-relationships, and, in particular, the issues facing them. However, the quantification of the flow of biomass along the chain was not successful, due to the immature nature of the chains with poorly constructed flow paths. Therefore, it is worthwhile for PISCES to address these issues to enable biomass to be promoted as a well established commercial commodity.

The proposed recommendations from the project include:
§ The establishment of an institution with the authority to implement a bioenergy sector policy framework;
§ The formulation of biomass product specifications (e.g. moisture content and size) in consultation with the Sri Lanka Standards Institution;
§ The development of a practical pricing mechanism for biomass;
§ and a revolving fund for cushioning price fluctuations.

Authors:
John Ndegwa, Namiz Musafer and Tameezan wa Gathui


References and documents:
http://www.pisces.or.ke/index.html
http://www.pisces.or.ke/pubs/pdfs/04007_ECO_Pisces_Bioenergy_Market.pdf
http://practicalaction.org/markets-and-livelihoods/mapping_the_market

Ewan and Namiz welcome questions, ideas and clarification based in this work. Namiz unfortunately has limited internet access at the moment but will answer as soon as he can.
Dear all.

Thanks Miriam for initiating this discussion. Comparing both Sri-Lankan and Kenya PMM, I realized that information flow mechanisms have not been given much attention in the model. It is important to recognise the enormous influence that the media can and other communication facilities have in the entire market network.

Is there anyone who think this is lacking in the PMM or has not been given enough attention?

Is communication flow and information sharing important in strengthening the market network?

We may also want to know how PMM has been done in other countries so i will request participants to give a short overview of such cases from their countries.

Thanks,

Kiprono
Dear all,

Sorry I have not been able to follow all the presentations in detail as I am
in the field. I was particularly impressed by the recommendations of Namiz *et
al* (although many others have also been very incisive) as something I have
come across in South Africa is somewhat of a 'missing link' in the biomass
energy market chain (if one can call it that). Not only this but I think it
is important to recognise that calling for institutions is very different to
the actual 'institutionalisation' of, for example, biomass related policy
and its final implementation. Although this is a perennial challenge it is
one research can help, which makes the calling for standards developed in
collaboration equally important, if not fundamental.

Kind regards,

Shaun

On 24 March 2011 13:43, <hedon@hedon.info> wrote:

>
> Dear all.
>
> Thanks Miriam for initiating this discussion. Comparing both Sri-Lankan and
> Kenya PMM, I realized that information flow mechanisms have not been given
> much attention in the model. It is important to recognise the enormous
> influence that the media can and other communication facilities have in the
> entire market network.
>
> Is there anyone who think this is lacking in the PMM or has not been given
> enough attention?
>
> Is communication flow and information sharing important in strengthening
> the market network?
>
> We may also want to know how PMM has been done in other countries so i will
> request participants to give a short overview of such cases from their
> countries.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Kiprono
>
> --
> HEDON PISCES E-conference - PISCES Market Mapping E-confernce
> Unsubscribe www.hedon.info/Groups | Visit the forum online
> http://www.hedon.info/forum17
>
>


--
Shaun Ruysenaar
----------------------
PhD Candidate and Commonwealth Scholar
Graduate School of Social and Political Science
The University of Edinburgh
Msc. BSc. (Hons) Env. Sci.
South Africa/Scotland
Cell: +27 (0)72 115 8003
Fax: 086 609 3840
Skype: flipside1982
PISCES Researcher www.pisces.or.ke
 
  • A practitioner's journal on household energy, stoves and poverty reduction.



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