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LondonRIG

Participatory Market Mapping – Benefits and limitations of a new tool in energy and development

Ewan Bloomfield (PAC), Emma Wilson (IIED) and Lucho Osorio (Practical Action)

This is linked to an e-conference running from 21-25th March 2011 to join the e-conference discussion visit: http://www.hedon.info/PISCESMarch2011

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Luis (Lucho) Osorio



International Coordinator - Markets & Livelihoods Program, Practical Action
Lucho is the International Coordinator of Practical Action’s Markets and Livelihoods Program. The program is currently working in Bangladesh, Kenya, Nepal, Peru, Sri Lanka, Sudan and Zimbabwe. Lucho contributes to the quality, efficiency and effectiveness of the teams’ work in the field. His roles involve: building the capacity of the teams in participatory market systems development; supporting the teams in project design and monitoring; and knowledge management. He has coordinated a cross-country learning project about the applications of Participatory Market Chain Analysis and recently managed the project ‘Becoming an Effective Learning Organization’, funded by USAID.

Emma Wilson, IIED



Senior Researcher, Sustainable Markets Group
Team Leader, Energy
Emma's expertise is in sustainable development, social impact assessment, corporate-community relations, community development
Her current work includes contribution of business activities to national- and local-level sustainable development; corporate-community relations; public and private sector partnerships for development; NGOs as development actors

Dr. Ewan Bloomfield



Energy Consultant and International Project Manager, Practical Action Consulting
Email: ewan.bloomfield@practicalaction.org.uk
Ewan joined PAC in November 2009 as an Energy Consultant. He manages projects on all aspects of household energy access and poverty reduction, for clients including DFID, World Bank and the EU, and in locations including Kenya, Madagascar, Sri Lanka, Rwanda and Ethiopia. Ewan has an engineering background, including a PhD from KwaZulu-Natal University in South Africa, and has worked on engineering and development projects for more than 10 years including Australia, Central Asia, Turkey, Southern Africa and Haiti.

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Miriam Hansen
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To register

Email Miriam@hedon.info
To make a donation towards the event please use the paypal payment method below.
Recommended donation: £5 (£3 concessions)
Please note we do not wish this to be a barrier to anyone wishing to attend.
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Seminar Programme

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Talks

An Introduction to Participatory Market Mapping

Lucho Osorio, Practical Action



Bio-energy for development: community perspectives

Emma Wilson, IIED

Biomass energy makes up 10 per cent of the world's primary energy supply mix, but this is predicted to rise to 30 per cent by 2050. This global ‘biomass energy boom’ could benefit non-OECD countries, who already depend on biomass for 26 per cent of their energy needs. By legalising and promoting sustainable biomass value chains, these countries could create a platform for more advanced biomass energy options in the future. Biomass energy has advantages including local accessibility and energy security, relatively high labour intensity in production, low carbon emissions over long timeframes, and the flexibility to be converted into heat, electricity, liquid or gas at a range of commercial scales.
IIED’s work on biomass energy and local access to energy more broadly seeks to explore opportunities for the poorest to benefit from low-carbon and localised energy systems. In many places, community awareness of all their energy options is very low, entrenched interests in existing energy value chains are hard to shift, while policy frameworks are not supportive of alternative energy options. Programmes and business models need to be developed with collaboration of local communities and a good understanding of local willingness and ability to pay for energy services, capacity for long-term local ownership and maintenance of systems, local employment potential, social and cultural acceptability of products and services. Communities themselves need to be aware of all their energy options in order to make the kinds of livelihood choices that will benefit them in the long term. Policy frameworks need to be designed to optimise the impact of programmes on poverty reduction, climate change adaptation (as well as mitigation) and the preservation of ecosystem services.

Participatory Market Mapping: Case Studies from Kenya and Sri Lanka

Ewan Bloomfield, Practical Action Consulting





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Last edited by Miriam Hansen .
Page last modified on Monday March 21, 2011 09:24:34 GMT.
  • A practitioner's journal on household energy, stoves and poverty reduction.



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